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Photo by Benjamin Shanks

Even though we all love to believe that we are intrinsically different and unique, we all share something incredibly similar but devastating— we all want to be “normal.” Humans love to be praised, adored, and admired; However, a deep, almost secret desire, we all posses is to fit in. Throughout the course of our lives we chase ideals and act accordingly to a set of standards we wish to blend into; to be looked upon as normal. But what if all these perceptions of normality are not just damaging, but also abnormal?

How does an act, a thought, ones appearance, etc. become classified as normal? What are the guidelines in order to categorize and label something as such? Do these criteria exist or do we create them due to the immense terror of instability? Our lives are filled with fears, but the one thing that scares us the most is the inability to alter a situation (possessing no control)— the dreadful, almost hopeless, position of immobility that either makes us or breaks us. The inability to accept what could not be changed is what led us to creating the concept of normality. …


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Photo by NeONBRAND

Why do we write? Do we write for the purpose of self-fulfillment or do we write out of pure necessity? Do we write because it gives us an opportunity to explore ourselves in a more intimate way or do we write because it is expected of us in a set curriculum? Independent of our reasons to write, they all, unfortunately, come with a set of fears — the fears of breaking “the rules.” No matter if the set boundaries are restricting us stylistically, grammatically, creatively, or expressively, all of them not only push people away from writing but also eliminate the possibility of someone falling in love with it in the first place. Writing is a form of expression and for many — once restricted — the desire to create seizes into a consistent paranoia over potential negative consequences. Writing is insanely critical to humans as it possesses the ability to vastly develop our minds creatively, critically, and socially. …


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Throughout the entirety of high school, majority of the students work towards one common goal: getting into college. There is a perceived notion that to get granted admission into a higher-level institution, one has to be “perfect” all around: in academics, extra curricular activities, SAT/ACT scores, etc. High school is a time where all of us set ourselves up to be the top dog — be the unbeatable. However, when we enter into college, we often find ourselves to no longer be the big fish in a small pond. Excelling in high school is vastly different from being the epitome of perfection in college. Even though it is habitual for us to equivocate perfection with excellent academic achievements, it is critical to comprehend that success is not measured by one’s academic accomplishments. …

About

Mary Dvorsky

I am currently a Junior at the University of California, Santa Barbara with a passion for writing. I hope that my little articles challenge your mind. :)

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